Stand up for

An Athabasca Rainbow Trout jumping in the air to catch an insect.

Alberta's
Native Trout

We need Alberta's
Native Trout

Alberta’s native trout and their habitats in the Eastern Slopes of the Rocky Mountains are part of our identity as Albertans. 

These important species and their habitats are currently being threatened by increased activity in the eastern slopes, invasive species, habitat loss, and other factors.

We can work together to ensure these fish, their habitats in the Eastern Slopes, and Alberta’s wild places are here for generations to come. 

Meet Alberta's Native Trout

The Eastern Slopes is home to many species of fish, such as the bull trout, Alberta’s provincial fish!
 
Use this tool to get to know Alberta’s native trout–the Athabasca rainbow trout, Westslope cutthroat trout, and bull trout.

Meet Alberta's Native Trout

The Eastern Slopes is home to many species of fish, such as the bull trout, Alberta’s provincial fish!
 
Use this tool to get to know Alberta’s native trout–the Athabasca rainbow trout, Westslope cutthroat trout, and bull trout.

Screenshot from interactive infographic showing text reading "Select a fish to learn more about it" with images of the Westslope Cutthroat trout, Bull trout, and Athabasca Rainbow Trout. Image has a black play button overlaid on top indicating that selecting the image will take you to new content.

Native Trout Habitats

Alberta’s native trout share their habitats in Alberta’s Eastern Slopes with other fish, animals, and plants. The water they swim in becomes our drinking water.

Use this tool to see what a healthy trout habitat looks like!

Native Trout Habitats

Alberta’s native trout share their habitats in Alberta’s Eastern Slopes with other fish, animals, and plants. The water they swim in becomes our drinking water.

Use this tool to see what a healthy trout habitat looks like!

Stand up for Alberta's Native Trout

We all use the land in the eastern slopes in different ways and we are all responsible for the health of Alberta’s native trout, their habitats, and Alberta’s wild places. All of our actions leave a mark, what do you want your mark to be?

Use this tool to learn what you can do to support Alberta’s native trout.

Stand up for Alberta's Native Trout

We all use the land in the eastern slopes in different ways and we are all responsible for the health of Alberta’s native trout, their habitats, and Alberta’s wild places. All of our actions leave a mark, what do you want your mark to be?

Use this tool to learn what you can do to support Alberta’s native trout.

Screenshot from interactive infographic called "Standing up for Native Trout" showing a recreational vehicle, an off highway vehicle (OHV), a fish with the text "angling" underneath, and a cow with the text "agriculture and ranching" underneath. Image has a black play button overlaid on top indicating that selecting the image will take you to new content.

Cumulative Effects

There is no single root cause behind the risks that Alberta’s native trout face. Effects from different human and natural activities in the past and present both contribute to the current state of Alberta’s native trout and their habitat.

Here’s one example of how all our actions can build on each other to impact native trout and their habitats. 

A mountain surrounded by trees.

Development

Industrial operators build roads into remote areas to access natural resources. These roads break up connectivity of water for native trout and impact water quality.

An off highway vehicle (OHV) or quad.

Recreation

The road provides access to the area to recreators who previously couldn't easily get there. OHVers, Anglers, Hikers, Campers, and other land users explore and enjoy the newly accessible land and add stress to native trout and their habitats.

A cute home and yard with the sun rising behind it.

Demand

Increased access from the roads causes increased demand in the area for places to sleep, eat, and collect supplies. Eventually gravel roads might be updated, communities  grow, and the areas that once were wild become developed.

It takes everyday actions and big picture thinking to make positive change. We all have a role in conserving and recovering Alberta’s native trout, their habitats, the Eastern Slopes, and Alberta’s wild places.

Stories of Alberta's
Native Trout

There are many positive actions currently taking place in Alberta to preserve native trout, their habitats, and Alberta’s wild places. Together we can learn from these stories and make change in our own community. 

Learn about some of the great work being done in our province in the following stories.

Swipe below for more stories

Contact

info@albertanativetrout.com

The logo for Trout Unlimited Canada. A blue and green trout jumping out of a stream. The logo for Canada Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) Southern Alberta Chapter. A green bear's paw with black claws.
The logo for Alberta Environment and Parks. The logo for Alberta Conservation Association. A blue and green mountain ecosystem with two wolves facing each other while a fish jumps into blue water between them.
The logo for Cows and Fish, also known as the Alberta Riparian Habitat Management Society. An ecosystem with a cow grazing near water where a fish swims and feeds on smaller fish. The logo for FRI Research, with text beneath reading "Informing Land & Resource Management".